Latest Ultrasound Reveals No More Kidney Stones

Since retiring to the Philippines over five years ago, I’ve had three major kidney stone attacks. The archipelago’s tropical climate puts a person at greater risk for kidney stone formation due to the way  our bodies manage water in a tropical setting. Perspiration becomes the customary way of how the body excretes water in tropical climates. Urination may slightly decrease due to urine being stored longer in the urinary tract. I wasn’t keeping myself hydrated enough before my attacks but now drink 2-3 liters of water daily. My latest ultrasound in the Philippines now reveals no more kidney stones and, as an added bonus, a healthy liver. I had been previously diagnosed with fatty liver disease back in July.

ambulance leaving guimaras provincial hospital

Since my last kidney stone attack late last September, days before my scheduled trip to the United States to visit my Dad, I’ve been taking my prescribed sodium citrate pills. Sodium citrate is an alkalizing agent that works by neutralizing excess acid in the blood and urine. I was also taking a local Filipino supplement, sambong leaves, in capsule form, which is used to treat kidney stones in the Philippines along with wounds and cuts, rheumatism, anti-diarrhea, anti spasms, colds and coughs and hypertension.

When I had my ultrasound in July, it was discovered I had seven kidney stones. A follow-up exam revealed three stones were left. In July, I was advised by the emergency room doctor at Guimaras Provincial Hospital to refrain from drinking any alcohol due to my fatty liver. I rarely would drink more than two or three brews a week anyway and personally knew that my unhealthy diet was the cause of my problem. But I listened to the physician and didn’t imbibe any adult beverages.

My August ultrasound revealed a “mild” fatty liver. Another doctor at the Guimaras hospital said it was fine to drink one or two beers a week. My latest ultrasound done at the STAT Lab in Iloilo left the doctor asking me if I had lost weight (I had) and if I was eating less fatty foods (I was.) Though I’ve been given a clean bill of health I’m not going to over do it and eat at McDonald’s or drink a case of San Miguel Pale Pilsen every day. I will stick to my routine of having two or three beers once a week with some expat friends over at Camp Alfredo, which has the coldest beer in Guimaras. But it’s good to not have any more kidney stones and to have the liver problem cleared up. The less trips I make to the hospital or doctor, the better.

8 comments

  1. That’s good news Dave. As a beer drinker myself, the fatty liver is always a concern. Yesterday while at a birthday event at the beach, I passed on everything considered fatty, and I only mildly indulged in the Lechon pig. I then took the added opportunity to cleanse my liver with some good Cutty Sark Scotch. Today….water, plenty of water!

    1. Thanks, RandyL. It would be hard to pass up some lechon, don’t blame you there. I think as along as my alcohol consumption is done in moderation, I should not have any problems. With another increase in the sin tax we are paying an extra two pesos for a bottle of San Mig, but it’s well worth the extra money. 😉

  2. Way to go Big Dawg! I still love to drink beer everyday but I also take what I call “a liver vacation” every so often. I ride my mountain bike average of 1 hour a day and (TRY) to limit my graphic design time to 6 hours a day. I also attend mass every morning just like I did on Guimaras. I guess I believe in that old adage… …healthy mind, body and spirit.
    Tom

    1. Thanks, Captain Tom. My Aussie buds and I have discovered the coldest beer on Guimaras, at Camp Alfredo. They have that “Zero Beer” refrigerator. With the temps here cranking up early, it’s good to have a cold one now and then. Bernard at Camp Alfredo does not charge us an entrance fee and the place is quiet and serene, much like your old stomping grounds at the Trappist Monastery (minus the beer.)

  3. Dave,
    Thats great news! Changing your diet paid off. That Camp Alfredo sounds like a nice and relaxing place to have couple of cold ones. I had blood work done this morning to check my Uric Acid level and Kidney/Liver function since i take cholesterol meds. Hopefully my Uric Level is down so will be able to drink beer and get back to my normal diet. If not i’ll just have to stick to a glass of wine a day.

    1. Yep, the diet change worked, Papa Duck. Next time you visit, we’ll have to take you over to Camp Alfredo. Maybe the Tom Cat will be back by then.
      Melinda was diagnosed last week with high levels of uric acid also. She has to stay away from her beloved mongo beans and all shellfish and drink a lot more water. The doctor doesn’t have her on any meds for the uric acid yet but she has to have a restricted diet for six months to one year.

  4. Good news Dave, your on the mend it sounds. As we get older it is harder to remain healthy. I remember all the things I used to do when I was younger, but have to change many things as I get older and less active.

    I am not too much of a drinker, so that part at least for me wont be a big problem I hope. But like yesterday, we had an above normal day here and it was pretty warm so had to clean out all the gutters on the house and shop, (apx. 580lf) since most all the leaves have now fallen in Virginia, after countless times of climbing up and down a 20ft ladder, I am so stiff this morning can hardly walk when I first stand. So I know my days of being able to do this kind of stuff is coming to an end, once my body tells me it cant do it anymore.

    It sounds like drinking large amounts of water is quite helpful there, so guess I better get used to doing that, and going to the bathroom every 30 minutes or so.

    1. Drinking large amounts of water here is essential, Bill S. But the good thing about having to pee, is that you don’t have to go a CR. Just go outside and take a whiz. No one cares.

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